Spilling

carlosbaila:

Marina Abramovic meets Ulay

“Marina Abramovic and Ulay started an intense love story in the 70s, performing art out of the van they lived in. When they felt the relationship had run its course, they decided to walk the Great Wall of China, each from one end, meeting for one last big hug in the middle and never seeing each other again. at her 2010 MoMa retrospective Marina performed ‘The Artist Is Present’ as part of the show, a minute of silence with each stranger who sat in front of her. Ulay arrived without her knowing it and this is what happened.”

BEAUTIFUL

(via glambien)

artandsciencejournal:

Imaging Bacteria: Jon Sasaki’s New Photographic Work

Jon Sasaki’s recent photo-based work situates itself decisively at the nexus of humour, history, art and science. Three works in particular, Microbes Swabbed From a Palette Used By A.J. Casson, Microbes Swabbed From a Palette Used By Frederick Varley, and Microbes Swabbed From a Palette Used By Tom Thomson, all from 2013, embody Sasaki’s characteristic critical wit; the delicate abstract formations are bacterial cultures, grown in Petri dishes and born of microbes culled from paint palettes. Enshrined at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, the palettes belong to late members of the Group of Seven.

A nod to the history and mythology of Canadian art and a persistent fascination with landscape, the microcosmic bacterial formations, while formally abstract, hint to painterly landscapes in their subtle tones, organic structures and tectonic shapes. The process of swabbing Group of Seven palettes speaks to a different mythology: that of the ‘Great Canadian painter.’ Is the use of such specific microbes, tied inextricably to the individual painter, an homage to the artist – or a clever critique of artistic genius? Regardless of critical intent, the inherent visual variety of the work affords each image a personality and the ability to act as a portrait of the artist whose palette microbes were used.

Sasaki’s photographs bridge the methodical and the mythological, re-imagining both the traditional Canadian landscape painting and the artist-worship trope. His employment of science-based methods in artistic practice works to undermine harsh disciplinary categories. Classification is cast off playfully; at the site of this betrayal, a rare experience of simultaneous wonder and amusement is afforded.

These and other new works by Jon Sasaki are on view at Jessica Bradley Gallery in Toronto from January 12 through March 16, 2013.

More of Sasaki’s work can be seen here.

-Natasha Chaykowski

unconsumption:

Repurposing for the holidays
Why not turn egg cartons into a tree? Or make ornaments out of them?
For additional reuse ideas and inspiration, check out the gallery of trees made from repurposed materials here, and other items — ornaments, garland, wreaths, and more — here.
(photo: Colégio Bernardette Romeira)
Think everyone should get into this sorta holiday idea! Some thing to do with the family and saves money and resources!

unconsumption:

Repurposing for the holidays

Why not turn egg cartons into a tree? Or make ornaments out of them?

For additional reuse ideas and inspiration, check out the gallery of trees made from repurposed materials here, and other items — ornaments, garland, wreaths, and more — here.

(photo: Colégio Bernardette Romeira)

Think everyone should get into this sorta holiday idea! Some thing to do with the family and saves money and resources!

(via craftdiscoveries)

earth-song:

Glass frog (or Glassfrogs) is the common name for the frogs of the amphibian family Centrolenidae (order Anura). While the general background coloration of most glass frogs is primarily lime green, the abdominal skin of some members of this family is translucent. The internal viscera, including the heart, liver, and gastrointestinal tract are visible through this translucent skin, hence the common name.

(Read more)

(via freshphotons)